The bitter truth about why you are unemployed

I came across this post on a BlackBerry Messenger Group that I am a part of, and it was very apt in explaining the mercurial nature of the employment scene, especially that of Nigeria. I am a living example of the truth(s) outlined herein, as I am working in a field that is totally unrelated with the course I studied at the university – and you know what: I’m loving every bit of it.

Reading through this would help you develop an open mind, and also aid you in recognizing loads of opportunities in disguise. It would also give you a head start towards developing employable skills outside your discipline and quit looking at your educational qualifications only. 

Cheers.
&
Ps: it’s not such a rigorous process to drop comments on my blog. I’ve tried to really simplify it, so if anything written herein speaks to you and you want to drop an opinion…please feel free.

OPEN LETTER TO FRESH GRADUATES

Photo Credit: http://www.google.com

Photo Credit: http://www.google.com

Dear Applicant: Thank you for your letter inquiring about positions in our economics department. At this time, we have no openings. However, I will keep your letter on file should an appropriate job become available.

At least, that’s what I am required to tell you. But here’s what I’d really like to say to you – and to every recent economics graduate who sends me the same letter.

First, I know it’s lousy for bachelor of arts grads looking for a job “in their field.” Twenty years ago, it was lousy for me too. It’s almost always lousy. In a way, it’s kind of supposed to be – a small rite of passage to welcome you into the working world. It’s sort of like being froshed.

But if I may, I would like to offer some advice.

Don’t be too fixated on landing a job “in your field.” The truth is, you don’t yet have a field. In university, you majored in economics, but that may or may not be your eventual field of professional work. The world is full of possibilities; limiting your search to an economist job is a terribly narrow way to start out.

You chose to study economics, which doesn’t necessarily imply that you’ll be an economist. Rather, it implies you have an aptitude for problem solving. You’re probably good at analyzing data. You can see different sides of an argument. And I’ll bet you’re excellent at finding solutions to problems. These are essential skills required in hundreds of rewarding (and lucrative) fields of professional employment.

Your ultimate field may actually be in sales for a biotech firm. It may be analyzing crime statistics for the city police. It may even be a rock star (just ask Mick Jagger). The world is full of “fields.”

What you’re facing is a common problem: BA graduates confuse their major area of study with what they expect to be their eventual careers. It doesn’t matter if it’s a degree in history, film studies, sociology, or comparative feminist literature.

You’ve successfully navigated your way through a four-year degree. Congratulations! That is no small accomplishment. But now you’re embarking on a totally different program of learning – one that will last the rest of your life. It’s called “What am I here for?”

That may sound all spiritual and existential, but don’t let it throw you off. It just means that your challenge from here on is to find what you’re good at, and keep getting better and better at it.

An apology, by the way, on behalf of society. We are sorry if we led you to believe that attending university would land you a good job. That’s not actually true. A polytechnic college will do this – and the job opportunities available right now are fantastic. A good option for you might be to continue post-university studies at a polytechnic.

But your university education, at least at the bachelor of arts level, was never intended to land you a job. It was intended to make you a more complete thinker. It was intended to teach you how to absorb complex information and make reasoned arguments. It was, quite simply, intended to teach you how to learn. Those are skills that you’ll use in any field of work.

Open your mind to all sorts of job possibilities. Don’t be too proud to start out in the service industry, or where you might get your fingernails dirty. Talk to as many people as you can about their career paths. Go live overseas for a year or two. But never, ever, allow yourself to think you’ve wasted your time in university if you don’t land a job as an economist.

Meanwhile, be encouraged and stay positive. And yes, I will keep your letter on file. But my guess is that when a position in my economics group eventually opens up, you’ll no longer be available.

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the glaring truth; my nicotine addiction

If you hide yourself in your problems, they would consume you

I am a smoker and I’m addicted to nicotine.

 

I never believed or agreed that I was addicted till I had gone too far out from where redemption was close; I don’t know how else to go about it.

I need help and I’m no longer afraid to ask for it.

I know I have a couple of loved ones out there,

I beg you to please join me in prayers

 

I am a very practical person,

So it beats me that I can’t and haven’t seen the logic behind cigarettes and their utter uselessness.

*The devil is a liar, and he has lost the war for my soul*

The Lord would redeem me; He is the only one who would never forsake me.

 

I have forsaken myself for so long,

Please someone tell me there is still hope for me

 

I think the only way to deal with an addiction, is to replace it with a new one.

I want to rededicate my life and my mind to God; feed off his word and try to be more like him.

*Christ-Like*

 

Habits are harder to deal with, because we do not entertain them in the open.

You can’t keep the glaring truth a secret.

 

I’d like your sincere feedback (comments); no judgments

Any and everything that could help me on this arduous journey to redemption will be appreciated.